Sleep Apnea

Sleep Apnea

Sleep Apnea

Sleep Apnea (AP-ne-ah) is a common disorder in which you have one or more pauses in breathing or shallow breaths while you sleep.

Breathing pauses can last from a few seconds to minutes. They may occur 30 times or more an hour. Typically, normal breathing then starts again, sometimes with a loud snort or choking sound.

Sleep apnea usually is a chronic (ongoing) condition that disrupts your sleep. When your breathing pauses or becomes shallow, you’ll often move out of deep sleep and into light sleep.

As a result, the quality of your sleep is poor, which makes you tired during the day. Sleep apnea is a leading cause of excessive daytime sleepiness.

Sleep apnea often goes undiagnosed. Doctors usually can’t detect the condition during routine office visits. Also, no blood test can help diagnose the condition.

Most people who have sleep apnea don’t know they have it because it only occurs during sleep. A family member or bed partner might be the first to notice signs of sleep apnea.

The most common type of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea. In this condition, the airway collapses or becomes blocked during sleep. This causes shallow breathing or breathing pauses.

When you try to breathe, any air that squeezes past the blockage can cause loud snoring. Obstructive sleep apnea is more common in people who are overweight, but it can affect anyone. For example, small children who have enlarged tonsil tissues in their throats may have obstructive sleep apnea.

Symptoms

The best way to first realize sleep apnea is the symptoms. Familiar sleep apnea indications include:

  • Waking up with a very sore or dry throat
  • Loud snoring
  • Occasionally waking up with a choking or gasping sensation
  • Sleepiness or lack of energy during the day
  • Sleepiness while driving
  • Morning headaches
  • Restless sleep
  • Forgetfulness, mood changes, and a decreased interest in sex
  • Recurrent awakenings or insomnia
  • Chronic Sleepiness during the day
  • Morning headaches
  • Memory or learning problems and not being able to concentrate
  • Feeling irritable, depressed, or having mood swings or personality changes
  • Waking up frequently to urinate
  • Dry mouth or sore throat when you wake up
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may be a risk factor for the development of other medical conditions:
  • High blood pressure (hypertension)
  • Heart failure
  • Heart rhythm disturbances
  • Atherosclerotic heart disease
  • Pulmonary hypertension
  • Insulin resistance
  • Death
  • Cognitive impairment (memory problems)
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • And gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)

If you have concerns about sleep apnea, talk to your GP or give us a call and we can connect you with sleep specialists who can help. Men’s health and Women’s health consultations include a full investigation where sleep apnea is suspected.

If you prefer to download the forms, print and fax them back to us at 604-261-8878 or scan and email to aamvan@gmail.com

Download Printable Version – MALE

Download Printable Version: FEMALE

Translate »